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Aviane / Alesse

Levonorgestrel - ethinyl estradiol is a progestin (levonorgestrel) and estrogen (ethinyl estradiol) combination birth control pill used for the prevention of pregnancy - by preventing ovulation (the release of an egg from an ovary) and causing changes in the mucus of the cervix which make it difficult for sperm to penetrate and for an egg to implant. Avaine may also be taken to treat acne in women 14 years of age and older or to regulate the menstrual cycle.

Alesse is also an option for emergency contraceptive.


Item Name Quantity Consultation Request This Medication
Aviane (Generic Alesse) 0.1mg 28 tablets Included Click Here
Aviane (Generic Alesse) 0.1mg 84 tablets Included Click Here


ALESSE DRUG INFO


IMPORTANT WARNING:

Cigarette smoking increases the risk of serious side effects from oral contraceptives, including heart attacks, blood clots, and strokes. This risk is higher for women over 35 years old and heavy smokers (15 or more cigarettes per day). If you take oral contraceptives, you should not smoke.


Why is Alesse prescribed?
 
Oral contraceptives (birth-control pills) are used in the prevention of pregnancy. Estrogen and progestin are two female sex hormones, the combination of which will prevent the release of eggs from the ovaries (ovulation) and alter the cervical mucus and the lining of the uterus. Oral contraceptives are considered to be very effective method of birth control, but they do not prevent the spread of AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. How should this medicine be used?
 
Oral contraceptives come in packets of 21 or 28 tablets to be consumed orally once a day. To avoid upset stomach, take oral contraceptives with food or milk. Take the tablet routinely at the same time every day (e.g., after dinner or at bedtime) to help you remember to take the tablet regularly. Missing doses increases your risk of becoming pregnant.
 
When first starting on this medicine, use an additional method of birth control until you have correctly taken 7 days' worth of medicine.
 
If you have a 21-tablet packet, take one tablet daily for 21 days and then none for seven days. Then start a new packet.
 
If you have a 28-tablet packet, take one tablet daily for 28 days. The remaining seven tablets are a different color. These tablets are not birth-control pills; they contain iron (ferrous fumarate) or an inactive ingredient. You should take one tablet daily continuously for 28 days in the order specified in your packet, starting a new packet the day after taking your 28th tablet.
 
Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully concerning when to take your first tablet (on the first or fifth day of your menstrual period or on the first Sunday after or on which bleeding begins). Take the oral contraceptive exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor. Do not stop taking this medicine without talking to your doctor.
 
If you have recently had a baby, wait until 4 weeks after giving birth to begin taking Aviane.
 
Before taking oral contraceptives, ask your pharmacist or doctor for a copy of the manufacturer's information for the patient and read it carefully. Other uses for this medicine
 
This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. What special precautions should I follow?
 
Before taking oral contraceptives,
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to estrogen, progestin, or any other medications.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, and nutritional supplements you are taking. Be sure to mention any of the following: acetaminophen (APAP, Tylenol); antibiotics; anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin); atorvastatin (Lipitor); clofibrate (Atromid-S); cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune); griseofulvin (Fulvicin, Grifulvin, Grisactin); HIV protease inhibitors such as indinavir (Crixivan) and ritonavir (Norvir); medications for seizures such as carbamazepine (Tegretol), phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton), phenytoin (Dilantin), and topiramate (Topamax); morphine (Kadian, MS Contin, MSIR, others); oral steroids such as dexamethasone (Decadron, Dexone), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisone (Deltasone), and prednisolone (Prelone); phenylbutazone; rifabutin (Mycobutin); rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane); temazepam (Restoril); theophylline (Theobid, Theo-Dur); and thyroid medication such as levothyroxine (Levothroid, Levoxyl, Synthroid). Before taking Yasmin, tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are taking angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as benazepril (Lotensin), enalapril (Vasotec), and lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril); angiotensin II antagonists such as irbesartan (Avapro), losartan (Cozaar), and valsartan (Diovan); aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDS) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn); diuretics ('water pills') such as amiloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone), and triamterene (Dyrenium); or heparin. Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • tell your doctor what herbal products you are taking, especially St. John's wort.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had breast lumps or malignant tumors; endometrial cancer; high blood pressure; high blood cholesterol and fats; diabetes (high blood sugar); asthma; stroke; blood clots; toxemia (high blood pressure during pregnancy); heart attack; epilepsy (seizures); migraine headaches; depression; liver, heart, gallbladder, or kidney disease; adrenal insufficiency (for Yasmin); jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); vaginal bleeding between menstrual periods; and excessive weight gain and fluid retention (bloating) during the menstrual cycle.
  • do not take oral contraceptives if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking oral contraceptives, call your doctor immediately.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental work, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking oral contraceptives.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you wear contact lenses. If you notice changes in vision or ability to wear your lenses while taking hormone replacement therapy, see an eye doctor.
What special dietary instructions should I follow while taking Aviane?
 
Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue with your typical food consumption. What should I do if I forget a dose of Alesse?
 
If you miss doses of your oral contraceptive, you may be at risk for becoming pregnant. Instructions about missed doses are different for different products. Carefully read the instructions in the manufacturer's information for the patient. If you have any questions, call your doctor or pharmacist. If you miss pills, you may need to use a backup method of birth control for 7 days or until the end of the cycle. What are the possible side effects of ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel (Aviane)?
 
Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.
 
Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:
  • sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body;
  • sudden headache, confusion, pain behind the eyes, problems with vision, speech, or balance;
  • chest pain or a sensation of heaviness, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;
  • a change in the pattern or severity of migraine headaches;
  • nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet; or
  • symptoms of depression (sleep problems, weakness, mood changes).

Continue using Aviane and talk to your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects:
  • mild nausea, vomiting, bloating, stomach cramps;
  • breast pain, tenderness, or swelling;
  • freckles or darkening of facial skin;
  • any differences in the hair on your scalp or body;
  • changes in weight or appetite;
  • problems with contact lenses;
  • vaginal itching or discharge;
  • changes in your menstrual periods, decreased sex drive; or
  • headache, nervousness, dizziness, tired feeling.

 
Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.
 
Aviane may increase the risk of developing endometrial and breast cancer, gallbladder disease, liver tumors, heart attack, stroke, and blood clots. Talk to your doctor about the risks of taking this medication.
 
Oral contraceptives may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while taking this medication. What storage conditions are needed for this medicine?
 
Keep this medication in the packet it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication. In case of emergency/overdose
 
In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911. What other information should I know?
 
Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. You should have a complete physical examination every year, including blood pressure measurements, breast and pelvic exams, and a Pap test. Follow your doctor's directions for examining your breasts; report any lumps immediately.
 
Before you have any laboratory tests, tell the laboratory personnel that you take oral contraceptives, as this medication may interfere with some laboratory tests.
 
If you miss one menstrual period and have taken your tablets as directed, continue taking them. However, if you miss one period and have not taken your tablets as directed or if you miss two menstrual periods and have taken the tablets as directed, call your doctor and use another method of birth control until you have a pregnancy test.
 
If you wish to stop taking oral contraceptives and become pregnant, use another method of birth control for at least 3 months after you stop taking the tablets to be sure that the medication will not harm the fetus. It may take a long time for you to become pregnant after you stop taking oral contraceptives, especially if you have never had a baby or if you had irregular, infrequent, or complete absence of menstrual periods before taking oral contraceptives. Questions should be discussed with your doctor.
 
Do not let anyone else take your medication. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription.
 
Emergency Contraception using Alesse / Aviane

 
Take 5 pills as soon as possible, then take 5 more pills 12 hours later
 
Treating Nausea Before It Happens:
 
You can use the non-prescription, anti-nausea, medicine meclizine (found either in Dramamine II or Bonine) to reduce the risk of nausea. It must be taken at least one hour before the first ECP dose.
 
You may take a second dose of anti-nausea medication 12 hours after taking the first dose, once again one hour before the second dosage of ECPs.
 
Do it Right: Do not take more ECPs (Aviane) then are suggested above. More hormone pills will probably not decrease the risk of pregnancy any further. More pills may however, increase the risk of nausea and other negative side effects.
 
About half of women using ECPs will have temporary nausea. It is usually mild and should stop in a day or so. If you vomit within two hours after taking a dose, call your clinician. You may need to repeat a dose.
 
Watch for Pill Danger Signals for the Next Couple of Weeks.
 
See Your Doctor at Once If You Have: Severe pain in your leg (calf or thigh)
Severe abdominal pain
Chest pain or cough or shortness of breath
Severe headaches, dizziness, weakness, or numbness
Blurred vision, loss of vision, or trouble speaking
Yellow jaundice

 
Important Information You Should Know:
 
Your next period may start a few days earlier or later than usual.
If your period doesn't start within four weeks, see your doctor for an examination and pregnancy test.
If you think that you may be pregnant, see your doctor at once, whether or not you plan to continue the pregnancy. The following are symptoms of pregnancy: a missed menstrual period, nausea, inexplicable fatigue, sore or enlarged breasts, headaches, and frequent urination
ECPs may not prevent an ectopic pregnancy (in the tubes or abdomen). Ectopic pregnancy is a medical emergency. Symptoms of pregnancy along with severe pain on one or both sides of the lower abdomen; abdominal pain and spotting, especially after a very light or missed menstrual period; and feeling faint or dizzy.

 
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